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REVIEW
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 121-123

Neuroprotective effect of helium after neonatal hypoxic ischemia: a narrative review


1 Department of Neurosurgery & Brain and Nerve Research Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Yijishan Hospital of Wan-nan Medical College, Wuhu, Anhui Province, China

Correspondence Address:
De-Gang Wu
Department of Neurosurgery, Yijishan Hospital of Wan-nan Medical College, Wuhu, Anhui Province
China
Gang Chen
Department of Neurosurgery & Brain and Nerve Research Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2045-9912.314332

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Neonatal hypoxic ischemia is one of the leading causes of permanent morbidity and mortality in newborns, which is caused by difficulty in supplying blood and oxygen to brain tissue and is often associated with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, death, short-term or long-term neurological and cognitive impairment. In recent years, the clinical therapeutic effects of noble gases have been gradually discovered and recognized. Numerous studies have shown that noble gases have unique neuroprotective effects to restore damaged nerve and relieve symptoms in patients. Although research on the neuroprotective mechanisms of xenon and argon has yielded a lot of results, studies on helium have stalled. Helium is a colorless, odorless, monoatomic inert gas. The helium has no hemodynamic or neurocognitive side effects and can be used as an ideal pre-adaptor for future clinical applications. In recent years, studies have shown that heliox (a mixture of helium and oxygen) pretreatment can protect the heart, brain, liver and intestine from damage in several animal models, where a variety of signaling pathways have been proved to be involved. There are numerous studies on it even though the mechanism of helium for protecting newborns has not been fully elucidated. It is urgent to find an effective treatment due to the high death rate and disability rate of neonatal hypoxic ischemia. It is believed that helium will be approved safely and effectively for clinical use in the near future.


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