Medical Gas Research

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1--7

Comparing intravenous dexmedetomidine and clonidine in hemodynamic changes and block following spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine in lower limb orthopedic surgery: a randomized clinical trial


Maryam Javahertalab1, Alireza Susanabadi1, Hesameddin Modir1, Alireza Kamali1, Alireza Amani2, Amir Almasi-Hashiani3 
1 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran
2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran
3 Department of Epidemiology, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran

Correspondence Address:
MD Alireza Susanabadi
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak
Iran

Dexmedetomidine (DEX) can prolong duration of anesthesia and shorten onset of sensory and motor block relative to clonidine. This study attempted to compare the efficacy of intravenous DEX and clonidine for hemodynamic changes and block after spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine in lower limb orthopedic surgery. In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 120 patients undergoing spinal anesthesia in lower limb orthopedic surgery were recruited and divided into three groups using balanced block randomization: DEX group (n = 40; intravenous DEX 0.2 µg/kg), clonidine group (n = 40; intravenous clonidine 0.4 µg/kg), and placebo group (n = 40; intravenous normal saline 10 mL) in which pain scores were assessed using visual analogue scales (at recovery, and 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after surgery) and time to achieve and onset of sensory and motor block. Statistically significant differences were found in mean arterial pressure among the groups at all times except baseline (P = 0.001), with a less mean arterial pressure and a prolonged duration of sensory and motor block (P = 0.001) in the DEX group where pain relieved in patients immediately after surgery and at above mentioned time points (P = 0.001). Simultaneous administration of intravenous DEX with ropivacaine for spinal anesthesia prolongs the duration of sensory and motor block and relieves postoperative pain, and however, can decrease blood pressure. Although intravenous DEX as an adjuvant can be helpful during spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine, it should be taken with caution owing to a lowering of mean arterial pressure in patients especially in the older adults. This study was approved by Ethical Committee of Arak University of Medical Sciences (No. IR.Arakmu.Rec.1395.450) in March, 2017, and the trial was registered and approved by the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT No. IRCT2017092020258N60) in 2017.


How to cite this article:
Javahertalab M, Susanabadi A, Modir H, Kamali A, Amani A, Almasi-Hashiani A. Comparing intravenous dexmedetomidine and clonidine in hemodynamic changes and block following spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine in lower limb orthopedic surgery: a randomized clinical trial.Med Gas Res 2020;10:1-7


How to cite this URL:
Javahertalab M, Susanabadi A, Modir H, Kamali A, Amani A, Almasi-Hashiani A. Comparing intravenous dexmedetomidine and clonidine in hemodynamic changes and block following spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine in lower limb orthopedic surgery: a randomized clinical trial. Med Gas Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 May 28 ];10:1-7
Available from: http://www.medgasres.com/article.asp?issn=2045-9912;year=2020;volume=10;issue=1;spage=1;epage=7;aulast=Javahertalab;type=0