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REVIEW
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 81-84

The role of carbon dioxide in acute brain injury


Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China

Correspondence Address:
MD, PhD Jian-Guo Xu
Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province
China
MD Jin-Quan Li
Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2045-9912.285561

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Carbon dioxide is a common gas in the air which has been widely used in medical treatment. A carbon dioxide molecule consists of two oxygen atoms and one carbon atom through a covalent bond. In the body, carbon dioxide reacts with water to produce carbonic acid. In healthy people, carbon dioxide is maintained within a narrow range (35–45 mmHg) by physiological mechanisms. The role of hypocapnia (partial pressure of carbon dioxide < 35 mmHg) and hypercapnia (partial pressure of carbon dioxide > 45 mmHg) in the nervous system is intricate. Past researches mainly focus on the effect of hypocapnia to nerve protection. Nevertheless, Hypercapnia seems to play an important role in neuroprotection. The mechanisms of hypocapnia and hypercapnia in the nervous system deserve our attention. The purpose of this review is to summarize the effect of hypocapnia and hypercapnia in stroke and traumatic brain injury.


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