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 Table of Contents  
EDITORIAL
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 170

Nitric oxide


1 Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China
2 State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin, China
3 Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, School of Biomedical Engineering, Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China

Date of Submission01-Nov-2019
Date of Decision05-Nov-2019
Date of Acceptance30-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication30-Dec-2019

Correspondence Address:
Qiang Zhao
State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin
China
Qianjun He
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, School of Biomedical Engineering, Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong Province
China
Zhi-Lu Yang
Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2045-9912.273953

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How to cite this article:
Yang ZL, Zhao Q, He Q. Nitric oxide. Med Gas Res 2019;9:170

How to cite this URL:
Yang ZL, Zhao Q, He Q. Nitric oxide. Med Gas Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 May 31];9:170. Available from: http://www.medgasres.com/text.asp?2019/9/4/170/273953



Nitric oxide (NO), a small free radical, plays a regulative role in some important physiological processes and exhibits exceptional therapeutic potential in the field of cardiovascular homeostasis, immune response, bone metabolism, neurotransmission, and cancer.[1],[2],[3],[4],[5] NO was first discovered by Joseph Priestly in 1722 and was considered as an environmental pollutant. The in-depth biomedical research on NO was boosted just after the clarification of its impact on blood vessel function and the relationship between endothelial derived relaxing factor and NO in 1987.[6] In 1998, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad, since then the NO became a star molecule and its research in the biomedical field was further developed. The design of NO-release materials, NO detection methods, NO-cell interaction and materials-cell-NO interaction has become the hot research points related to NO science. This special issue on NO research highlights recent advances in the points mentioned above.

For years, as a fundamental research, scientists have focused on two aspects associated with NO, that is, how to induce cells generate expected amount of NO, and how to regulate cell status on purpose by NO. In this special issue, Li et al. shows a promising application of Mg-Zn-Y-Nd as stent alloys by investigating the influence of its degradation behavior on NO release of vascular endothelial cells and find that the alloy degradation product concentration and the time of degradation had positive correlation for NO generation. Moreover, they also demonstrate the downregulation of interferon-γ in lymphocytes after NO treatment tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which provides an immune perspective to employ NO for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Meanwhile, researchers have developed various methods for NO delivery. For instance, Luo et al. loads ebselen, a molecule that could play the similar role as glutathion peroxidase (GPx-like) function, into micelles and are further assembled into a layer-by-layer coating. Controllable catalytic generation of NO and favorable biological effects are gained based on such a delivery strategy. Except for this particular case of NO-releasing materials, Yang et al. take a brief introduction of latest achievements in the recent three years, involving the coatings which may mimic the vascular endothelium to treat atherosclerosis, the nanocarriers which aim to generate NO by a sustained way for anticancer, and the framework which modifies the prodrug more stably to apply to cardiovascular stent or tumor targeted drug mainly. Despite great advances in NO functional material design and application, the methods for quantifying NO concentration and its metabolites are also crucial to well know about its biological functions and effects. He et al. summarize various methods for in vitro and in vivo NO detection, and also introduces their merits and demerits in this special issue.

In general, this special issue on NO has covered research on cellular level, materials development and NO detection. Reports and reviews on NO presented in this issue will provide a further understanding about the real role of NO in cardiovascular diseases, immune disorders and cancer.

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Peer review: Externally peer reviewed.

Open access statement: This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.



 
  References Top

1.
Moncada S, Palmer RM, Higgs EA. Nitric oxide: physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. Pharmacol Rev. 1991;43:109-142.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Ralston SH. The Michael Mason Prize Essay 1997. Nitric oxide and bone: what a gas! Br J Rheumatol. 1997;36:831-838.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
MacMicking J, Xie QW, Nathan C. Nitric oxide and macrophage function. Annu Rev Immunol. 1997;15:323-350.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Kano T, Shimizu-Sasamata M, Huang PL, Moskowitz MA, Lo EH. Effects of nitric oxide synthase gene knockout on neurotransmitter release in vivo. Neuroscience. 1998;86:695-699.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lala PK. Significance of nitric oxide in carcinogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapy. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 1998;17:1-6.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Yetik-Anacak G, Catravas JD. Nitric oxide and the endothelium: history and impact on cardiovascular disease. Vascul Pharmacol. 2006;45:268-276.  Back to cited text no. 6
    




 

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