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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 175-180

A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat


1 Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Équipe Résidente de Recherche Subaquatique Opérationnelle, Toulon, France; Université Laval, Faculté de Médecine, Département d'Anesthesiologie, Québec, QC, Canada
2 Université Laval, Faculté de Médecine, Département d'Anesthesiologie, Québec, QC, Canada
3 Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées Sainte-Anne, Service de Médecine Hyperbare et Expertise Plongée, Toulon, France
4 Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Équipe Résidente de Recherche Subaquatique Opérationnelle, Toulon, France

Correspondence Address:
Jacques H Abraini
Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Équipe Résidente de Recherche Subaquatique Opérationnelle, Toulon; Université Laval, Faculté de Médecine, Département d'Anesthesiologie, Québec, QC

Nicolas Vallée
Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Équipe Résidente de Recherche Subaquatique Opérationnelle, Toulon
France
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: Monatomics Technology SAS (Paris, France) has patent applications on this work. HND is a shareholder in Monatomics Technology SAS. All other authors declare no competing interest.


DOI: 10.4103/2045-9912.215746

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The noble gases xenon (Xe) and helium (He) are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2) in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances – gases, metals, rubbers, etc. – is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.


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