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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 14-19

Gas transport during in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing of inert gas therapies


1 Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, 78354, Jouy-en-Josas, France; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA
2 Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, 78354, Jouy-en-Josas, France
3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2G8, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Ira Katz
Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, 78354, Jouy-en-Josas, France; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2045-9912.179342

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New gas therapies using inert gases such as xenon and argon are being studied, which require in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments. Examples of the kinetics of gas transport during such experiments are analyzed in this paper. Using analytical and numerical models, we analyze an in vitro experiment for gas transport to a 96 cell well plate and an in vivo delivery to a small animal chamber, where the key processes considered are the wash-in of test gas into an apparatus dead volume, the diffusion of test gas through the liquid media in a well of a cell test plate, and the pharmacokinetics in a rat. In the case of small animals in a chamber, the key variable controlling the kinetics is the chamber wash-in time constant that is a function of the chamber volume and the gas flow rate. For cells covered by a liquid media the diffusion of gas through the liquid media is the dominant mechanism, such that liquid depth and the gas diffusion constant are the key parameters. The key message from these analyses is that the transport of gas during preclinical experiments can be important in determining the true dose as experienced at the site of action in an animal or to a cell.


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